‘Pet Sematary’ Review: A Chilling Take on Stephen King That Can’t Live Up to Its Source Material — SXSW

Published on Mar 17, 2019

‘Pet Sematary’ Review: A Chilling Take on Stephen King That Can’t Live Up to Its Source Material — SXSW

Pet Sematary” was and remains one of Stephen King’s most devastating horror novels — a meditation on grief, guilt, and the distinct way the two are intrinsically linked. King almost didn’t release his novel; his wife Tabitha and his friend Peter Straub thought it was too upsetting, and so it sat on a shelf until King needed a novel to complete his contract with Doubleday. In 1983, “Pet Sematary” was released, and just six years later it hit the mainstream with a film directed by Mary Lambert. Almost 30 years after Lambert’s film, directors Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer (“Starry Eyes”) have collaborated on a new adaptation of King’s novel that succeeds in some areas where the 1989 version failed while ultimately failing to deliver an ending that resonates as deeply as its source material.

Louis (Jason Clarke) and Rachel Creed (Amy Seimetz) have just relocated with their two children

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Author: Britt Hayes