‘Pain and Glory’ Review: Pedro Almodóvar’s Best Movie in Years Is His Most Personal — Cannes

Published on May 17, 2019

‘Pain and Glory’ Review: Pedro Almodóvar’s Best Movie in Years Is His Most Personal — Cannes

Across 30-plus years of filmmaking, Pedro Almodóvar has accrued the auteurist equivalence of a god, and his distinctive romantic whimsy carries such weight that the tagline “a film by Almodóvar” conveys more brand than vision. “Pain and Glory,” the filmmaker’s best and most personal movie in years, brings him back to mortal terrain. A grounded melancholic rumination on aging and artistic intent steeped in the aging director’s own experiences, it may be the closest Almodóvar comes to crafting a memoir in the medium he knows best.

At least, it looks that way on the surface. “Pain and Glory” stars an exceptionally world-weary Antonio Banderas, his face caked in salt-and-pepper stubble and framed by an unruly mop of hair, as an acclaimed director wrestling with his past and present. The actor looks so much like his long-time collaborator that “Pain and Glory” may well be deemed “a film about Almodóvar.

Read full article at: Indiewire

Author: Eric Kohn