True/False Film Fest Announces First Selections for 2019 Edition

Gearing up for its 16th edition, the True/False Film Fest has announced the first components of this year’s programming. Filmmaker Hassan Fazili, director of the just-premiered-at-Sundance Midnight Traveler, and his family, will receive the True Life Fund, awarded to documentary subjects. Click here to read our interview with Fazili. This year’s True Vision Award will be presented to Spain-born, Mexico-based filmmaker Nuria Ibáñez Castañeda. Following on the heels of past recipients such as Laura Poitras and Claire Simon, Ibáñez Castañeda—whose films include 2013’s excellent The Naked Room, a harrowing look inside a therapist’s office counseling abused children—will receive the award along with a retrospective […]

Judd Apatow To Team With Pete Davidson For A New Comedy Film

Judd Apatow did it for Amy Schumer. Now, the filmmaker responsible for some of the biggest comedies of the last 20 years is hoping to launch the career of Pete Davidson into the stratosphere.

According to THR, Apatow is developing a new star-vehicle for comedian Pete Davidson, similar to the film “Trainwreck,” which put Schumer into A-list status. Currently untitled, the film will take inspiration from Davidson’s life, which includes losing his firefighter father during the tragic events of 9/11.

Continue reading Judd Apatow To Team With Pete Davidson For A New Comedy Film at The Playlist.

Peter Jackson to Make New Beatles Documentary With Unused ‘Let It Be’ Footage
Peter Jackson to Make New Beatles Documentary With Unused ‘Let It Be’ Footage

Peter Jackson has found his next project: The “Lord of the Rings” filmmaker is making a new documentary about The Beatles, Variety reports. The project will repurpose 55 hours of unused footage shot in 1969 for The Beatles’ 1970 film “Let It Be.” While no release date has been announced, Paul McCartney previously hinted that a new project was in the works to mark the film’s 50th anniversary. A thrilling proposition on its own, Jackson’s involvement will take the project to another level.

“The 55 hours of never-before-seen footage and 140 hours of audio made available to us ensure this movie will be the ultimate ‘fly on the wall’ experience that Beatles fans have long dreamt about,” Jackson said in a statement. “It’s like a time machine transports us back to 1969, and we get to sit in the studio watching these four friends make great music together.”

Originally released in 1970, “Let It Be

Zack Snyder’s Netflix Zombie Heist Movie Is Basically A Sequel To ‘Dawn of the Dead’ Discussed In 2008

Get ready for Zack Snyder unleashed.

The director of “300,” “Watchmen,” and “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” has finally decided on what his very next project is going to be, and thanks to the folks at Netflix, this film will showcase Snyder without any restrictions. God help us all.

THR is reporting that Snyder has signed with Netflix to direct the film, “Army of the Dead.” As the name might suggest, ‘Army’ is the director’s return to the zombie genre that kickstarted his career in 2004 with “Dawn of the Dead.” And it would appear that the original sequel that he has developed in 2008 but was never made is now getting ready to begin production thanks to Netflix and its large bank account.

Continue reading Zack Snyder’s Netflix Zombie Heist Movie Is Basically A Sequel To ‘Dawn of the Dead’ Discussed In 2008 at The Playlist.

“We Had Over 200 Special Effects”: Director Noble Jones | Tomorrow Man

Whenever directors watch their own films, they always do so with the knowledge that there are moments that occurred during their production — whether that’s in the financing and development or shooting or post — that required incredible ingenuity, skill, planning or just plain luck, but whose difficulty is invisible to most spectators. These are the moments directors are often the most proud of, and that pride comes with the knowledge that no one on the outside could ever properly appreciate what went into them. So, we ask: “What hidden part of your film are you most privately proud of […]

Matt Reeves Says “Noir Batman” Coming 2021 With “Rogues Gallery” Of Multiple Villains

Despite it seeming like Matt Reeves has been toiling away at “The Batman” for what feels like a decade, the film is very much still on its way. He’s just taking his sweet time with it, making it just right. And as revealed in a new interview, what the director has up his sleeve is very different than what fans have seen before.

Speaking to THR, the director talked all things ‘Batman,’ including which villains to expect, a release date, and what separates his version of the Caped Crusader from previous film versions that have been hugely successful.

Continue reading Matt Reeves Says “Noir Batman” Coming 2021 With “Rogues Gallery” Of Multiple Villains at The Playlist.

Dispatches from Park City — Tuesday, Jan 29th: The Farewell, American Factory,Luce and More

Welcome to Day Six of Sundance. The $70 parking lot sign has been marked down to $50, the first-weekend scrum of parties is history and Main Street is emptier. Time to get down to serious viewing in the days that remain. Sundance routinely programs about 120 features. My personal best—four screenings a day, seven or eight days straight—is about 30 films. The math tells me that I see a quarter of Sundance each year. In other words, no two people see the same Sundance. What follows are notes on films I feel are notable. Lulu Wang’s The Farewell confirms […]

‘Knock Down the House’ Review: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Appears in Emotional, Energetic Doc
‘Knock Down the House’ Review: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Appears in Emotional, Energetic Doc

No one would believe the ending of Rachel Lears’ “Knock Down the House” if it wasn’t splashed all over the news months ago, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t land with a gut punch and more than a few tears. Originally imagined — and, as evidenced by a successful Kickstarter campaign, quite literally pitched — as a documentary about the changing face of America’s political strivers, the inspiring film inevitably changed significantly along the way. The result is an immediate and engaging look inside a system so many newbies are eager to mold into a fresh vision, bolstered by the star wattage of a newly minted political powerhouse.

Lears’ film focuses on four first-time candidates scattered around the country, all women, all from working class backgrounds, all pursuing political office for different reasons, though the film inevitably gives way to the full-force power of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s campaign and charisma.

Dispatches from Park City — Tuesday, Jan 29th: The Farewell, American Factory,Luce and More

Welcome to Day Six of Sundance. The $70 parking lot sign has been marked down to $50, the first-weekend scrum of parties is history and Main Street is emptier. Time to get down to serious viewing in the days that remain. Sundance routinely programs about 120 features. My personal best—four screenings a day, seven or eight days straight—is about 30 films. The math tells me that I see a quarter of Sundance each year. In other words, no two people see the same Sundance. What follows are notes on films I feel are notable. Lulu Wang’s The Farewell confirms […]

Rotterdam 2019: Very Personal Cinema

GardenWhile on television and in most mainstream cinemas the talking-head, omnisciently narrated, impersonal and frequently uncritical documentary is the conventional norm, in the festival world one can find a welcome and wonderfully more diverse array of approaches to nonfiction filmmaking. These can range from the modest warmth of diary films to dry systematic analyses, from austerely minimalist landscape studies to epic sagas of found footage. Perhaps most common of these more inquisitive types of documentary is the essay film, which frequently uses many approaches to pursue its subject in a more argumentative yet intellectually roving manner.At Rotterdam, Colombian director Federico Atehortúa Arteaga has found a sharply evoked spot in between personal and national nonfiction storytelling with his feature debut, the essay film Pirotecnia (Mute Fire). Its origins are in a desire to tell the history of Colombian cinema, which Atehortúa Arteaga locates in a 1906 assassination attempt on President Rafael Reyes Prieto,

Source: MUBI

‘Now Apocalypse’ Review: Gregg Araki’s Insane Stoner Comedy Is for Generation Nobody — Sundance
‘Now Apocalypse’ Review: Gregg Araki’s Insane Stoner Comedy Is for Generation Nobody — Sundance

For a TV series promising immediate action in its title, Gregg Araki’s “Now Apocalypse” sure takes its sweet time getting to the apocalypse. In fact, through the first three episodes, an “inciting incident” is entirely absent. Plagued by the same problem facing many feature film writers who decide to try their hand at TV, the familiar 10-episode Starz series is so focused on delaying whatever weird apocalyptic payoff it’s hiding that the early episodes never introduce an enticing, enlightening, or all that enjoyable story at all.

That doesn’t mean there’s a lack of brash, strange moments. The premiere, “The Beginning of the End,” starts with Ulysses (Avan Jogia), commonly called Uly, having sex with a married guy and escaping just before the hubby comes home. Narrating via a video diary he’s making, Uly knows his “gigantic adventures” are going to get him in trouble one day,

Disney, AMC Team for Free ‘Black Panther’ Screenings to Celebrate Black History Month

From February 1–7, Disney will return Academy Award nominee and SAG winner “Black Panther” to the big screen to celebrate Black History Month. The one-week engagement will run at 250 participating AMC Theatres locations, each screening the film twice a day. The unexpected though pleasant surprise is that tickets will be free for all attendees; however pre-registration is required.

Accompanying this news was an announcement that Disney will give a $1.5 million grant to support Uncf (United Negro College Fund) in furthering its 75 year-old mission to ensure access to college for minority students. The contribution is in keeping with the company’s stated commitment to expanding its pipeline of talent, by looking to diverse communities.

“’Black Panther’ is groundbreaking for many reasons, including the rich diversity of voices behind its success,” said Robert A. Iger, chairman and chief executive officer, The Walt Disney Company. “The story also showcases the power of knowledge to

Sundance Notebook: Sexuality on Screen, Herzog in the Snow and America’s Shameful Past… and Present

Lobbies and shuttles are the office water cooler of Sundance. 10:00 Am phone pitches for movies about baseball aren’t uncommon, and neither are frantic PR people. Yesterday someone on their phone was very much upset about the fireplace in their condo not working, while others I encountered were extremely concerned about how to get the Jewish community of Wichita to the movies. I also hear countless recommendations for how films should have ended, from critics and locals alike. *** Fuck You Short, Shorts Program 3 Anette Sidor / 2018, 15mins. / Sweden Young actors sharply take on the power dynamics […]

‘Brittany Runs a Marathon’ Review: Jillian Bell Speeds Into Leading Lady Status in Winning Comedy

It’s easy enough to picture the dramatic version of Paul Downs Colaizzo’s directorial debut, “Brittany Runs a Marathon,” which would most definitely open with a Lao Tzo quote about the journey of a thousand miles and it would absolutely end with a flood of tears. The greatest trick of Colaizzo’s winning comedy: it doesn’t need that cheese factor to inspire plenty of tears and cheers, because it’s got something better than overused quotes or overhyped drama. It’s got Jillian Bell.

Loosely based on the experience of one of Colaizzo’s friends, “Brittany Runs a Marathon” finally gives perpetual breakout talent Bell the chance to not only show off her prodigious comedic chops, but also a refreshing dramatic streak that adds actual pathos to a special character in a special film. A lovable goofball, Brittany is a literal crowdpleaser who only seems at ease when

First Time Filmmakers Shine at IndieWire Dinner Presented by Rimowa

IndieWire’s annual first-time filmmakers dinner at the Sundance Film Festival, presented by Rimowa, celebrated rising auteurs the night of January 28 at the restaurant Firewood on Main Street in the heart of Park City, Utah. Attendees included Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre (‘The Mustang’), Tayarisha Poe (‘Selah and the Spades’), Noble Jones (‘The Tomorrow Man’), Jocelyn DeBoer & Dawn Luebbe (‘Greener Grass’), Bert & Bertie (‘Troop Zero’), Rhys Ernst (‘Adam’), and Ivete Lucas (‘Pahokee’), among many others.

“Filming in 44 Locations in 22 Countries on Six Continents”: Dp Nicholas de Pencier on Anthropocene: The Human Epoch

Dp Nicholas de Pencier has long collaborated with his wife, director Jennifer Baichwal, on her projects. One of their most acclaimed films, Manufactured Landscapes, was a profile of large-format landscape photographer (and fellow Canadian) Edward Burtynsky. Now, on Anthropocene: The Human Epoch, Burtynsky moves from subject to collaborator on a large project tackling nothing less than humanity’s impact on the planet. Filmed over four years, the project involved a great deal of travel, technical planning and risk; via email, de Pencier answered questions about his work on the ambitious documentary. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being the cinematographer of […]

“Filming in 44 Locations in 22 Countries on Six Continents”: Dp Nicholas de Pencier on Anthropocene: The Human Epoch

Dp Nicholas de Pencier has long collaborated with his wife, director Jennifer Baichwal, on her projects. One of their most acclaimed films, Manufactured Landscapes, was a profile of large-format landscape photographer (and fellow Canadian) Edward Burtynsky. Now, on Anthropocene: The Human Epoch, Burtynsky moves from subject to collaborator on a large project tackling nothing less than humanity’s impact on the planet. Filmed over four years, the project involved a great deal of travel, technical planning and risk; via email, de Pencier answered questions about his work on the ambitious documentary. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being the cinematographer of […]

“We are Comfortable Treating Rushes as You Would Piecing Together a Doc”: Editor Bryan Mason on Animals

Australian editor and cinematographer Bryan Mason has collaborated with director Sophie Hyde before; their first was 52 Tuesdays, a mother-daughter drama in which the latter is transitioning genders. Adapted by Emma Jane Unsworth from her novel, Animals examines another kind of relationship at a moment of change, tracking two Dublin friends in their early 30s whose years of boozing and companionship are starting to be too much to handle. Also serving as the project’s Dp, via email Mason discussed the challenges of editing a project with input coming from Australia, the UK and Ireland, getting lost in early edits, and reshaping the […]

Edgar Wright & Chris Miller Feel The Best Director To Take Over The ‘Guardians’ Franchise Is Still James Gunn

It was way back in July 2018 when the controversy over decade-old tweets affected James Gunn and forced his dismissal from “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3” by Disney. And even though we are 6 months out from the initial story, fans still aren’t any closer in knowing who might take over for the man who created the beloved Marvel franchise. But filmmakers Edgar Wright and Chris Miller have a suggestion for Disney – James Gunn.

Continue reading Edgar Wright & Chris Miller Feel The Best Director To Take Over The ‘Guardians’ Franchise Is Still James Gunn at The Playlist.

‘Luke Cage’: Star Mike Colter on How Unlikely It Is the Series Will Return

Following months of what could be summarised as “behind-the-scenes turmoil” in 2018, with the future of the series at stake, Marvel and Netflix, unable to resolve their creative differences, agreed to cancel “Marvel’s Luke Cage.” The official announcement was made on October 19, 2018, leaving diehard fans in a lurch. Over the weekend at the Sundance Film Festival, star of the series, Mike Colter, stopped by the IndieWire Studio, presented by Dropbox, and addressed managing editor Christian Blauvelt’s question of whether there is any possibility of the series returning.

“I have no clue, because it’s one of those things that didn’t happen for any other reason than the powers that be deciding that it was something that they wanted to take back into another platform,” Colter said.

At the time of the cancelation, Marvel said it had no plans to continue or reboot its Luke Cage series on any other platform,

‘Blinded By The Light’: The Transformative Power Of Bruce Springsteen Fuels This Excellent Crowdpleaser [Sundance Review]

Heartwarming, life-affirming cinema always has the perilous potential for turning mawkish. But uplifting music, free of the sometimes overwrought dimensions of moviemaking, is usually free of such burdens. Zeroing in on the advantages of the latter and mostly avoiding the pitfalls of the former, filmmaker Gurinder Chadha succeeds in achieving that exuberant, ineffable feeling when music can change your life. In her inspiring new drama “Blinded by the Light,” Chadha (“Bend it Like Beckham“) taps into the anthemic spirit of the always-stirring songs of Bruce Springsteen.

Continue reading ‘Blinded By The Light’: The Transformative Power Of Bruce Springsteen Fuels This Excellent Crowdpleaser [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.

‘Cold Case Hammarskjöld’ Review: This Twisty Doc Suggests Early Un Leader Was Murdered
‘Cold Case Hammarskjöld’ Review: This Twisty Doc Suggests Early Un Leader Was Murdered

For better or worse, the last few years have seen a sizable influx of twist-dependent documentaries: Non-fiction odysseys that start as one thing and then — due to an ominous circumstance of some kind — suddenly veer in an unexpected new direction, these films tend to dig their own rabbit holes and then gain narrative traction from the gravity of plummeting down them. Looking at the success of recent examples like “Catfish,” “Tickled,” and even last year’s “Three Identical Strangers” (which might be a bit less coy about its big reveal), it seems that “Wtf!” has become an increasingly desirable reaction in a culture that fears and fetishizes spoilers in equal measure.

Cold Case Hammarskjöld” is far and away the best and most shocking of these films. It’s the only one in which the big “twist” has genuine real-world implications that stretch beyond the story at hand, and the only

Steven Soderbergh Talks Mentoring & Helping Nolan Get ‘Insomina’ & The Russo Brothers Get ‘Captain America: Winter Soldier’

Yes, Steven Soderbergh is an Oscar-winning filmmaker with classic films like “Traffic,” “Erin Brockovich,” “sex, lies & videotape,” and the ‘Ocean’s’ franchise. However, he’s also one of the smartest minds in the film industry, and one of the more generous creators around. And he shows exactly why that’s not hyperbole in a new interview with Deadline.

Over the course of the lengthy (but great) interview, Soderbergh hits all the hot-button issues of the day, while also sharing some really fun stories.

Continue reading Steven Soderbergh Talks Mentoring & Helping Nolan Get ‘Insomina’ & The Russo Brothers Get ‘Captain America: Winter Soldier’ at The Playlist.

Demi Moore Resents that Older Women Are Often Forced to Play Villains — IndieWire Sundance Studio
Demi Moore Resents that Older Women Are Often Forced to Play Villains — IndieWire Sundance Studio

In Patrick Brice’s latest Sundance Midnight offering “Corporate Animals,” Demi Moore plays a powerful, all-consuming CEO. Speaking with managing editor Christian Blauvelt at the IndieWire Studio presented by Dropbox, Moore talked about what she keeps in mind when signing on to new projects at this point in her career.

“I do want to be careful not to play into a cliche, which is that all older women are evil, bitter villains, which is one of the next kind of things that needs to be overcome,” Moore said. “We want romance too! We want all those things!”

In “Corporate Animals,” her character Lucy leads a disastrous retreat through some treacherous New Mexico caves. Karan Soni and Jessica Williams play the unwitting employees at her company, who find much more underground than either of them bargain for.

Moore says that the supporting cast and the filming environment helped her realize the

#MeToo Is Prompting the ‘Reeducation of Men,’ Say NBC’s Female Stars
#MeToo Is Prompting the ‘Reeducation of Men,’ Say NBC’s Female Stars

For those wondering if substantial change has been made on television sets since the dawn of #MeToo, “Good Girls” star Retta has noticed at least one big difference — men are now asking questions.

“Last season, when everything was coming out, we had a lot of male guest stars actually ask us questions, which we found interesting and nice,” she said at NBC’s Women of Drama panel at the Television Critics Association press tour.

Some of those questions, she said, revealed that some men “are clueless about certain things,” but, in general, the questions also revealed the reason “everyone’s aware… they know that’s what’s going on in the industry — specifically [thanks to] men asking us what we’ve dealt with.”

Lorraine Toussaint, who stars in the midseason drama “The Village,” noted that another aftereffect of the #MeToo movement has been the fact that women felt empowered to speak out,

“The Harder Life Was for Us, the Stronger the Images Were:” Director Hassan Fazili on the Perils of His Flight-from-the Taliban Doc, Midnight Traveler

As headlines blare possible peace talks between the U.S. and the Taliban, and with its intersection of politics and filmmaking, Hassan Fazili’s Midnight Traveler, which premiered this week at the Sundance Film Festival in World Documentary Competition, is bound to be one of the festival circuit’s most discussed pictures this year. (It travels next month to the Berlin Film Festival.) Midnight Traveler charts the Fazili family’s escape from the Taliban after Fazili became the group’s target due to his controversial documentary Peace. Fazili, with the help of his filmmaker wife Fatima and daughters Nargis and Zahra, filmed the story of […]

“The Harder Life Was for Us, the Stronger the Images Were:” Director Hassan Fazili on the Perils of His Flight-from-the Taliban Doc, Midnight Traveler

As headlines blare possible peace talks between the U.S. and the Taliban, and with its intersection of politics and filmmaking, Hassan Fazili’s Midnight Traveler, which premiered this week at the Sundance Film Festival in World Documentary Competition, is bound to be one of the festival circuit’s most discussed pictures this year. (It travels next month to the Berlin Film Festival.) Midnight Traveler charts the Fazili family’s escape from the Taliban after Fazili became the group’s target due to his controversial documentary Peace. Fazili, with the help of his filmmaker wife Fatima and daughters Nargis and Zahra, filmed the story of […]

Ifp-Blackhouse Multicultural Producers Lab, With Seven Inaugural Female Fellows, Announced at Sundance

The Independent Filmmaker Project, Filmmaker‘s parent organization, announced Friday a partnership with The Blackhouse Foundation, a non-profit organization that works to expand opportunities for black multi-platform content creators, to launch the Ifp-Blackhouse Multicultural Producers Lab, sponsored by HBO Corporate Social Responsibility Department, beginning in January 2019. From the press release: A cohort of seven (7) producers of innovative fiction and nonfiction projects were selected by Ifp, Blackhouse, and HBO. These Fellows will participate in this year-long, collaborative program to expand the number of multicultural production companies; to increase their pipeline of content; and to support the sustainability of mid-career independent producers and the scale […]

Back to One, Episode 43: Noomi Rapace

Noomi Rapace became an international sensation playing Lisbeth Salander in the original, Swedish version of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo and its sequels. Hollywood beckoned, and leading roles in such films as Ridley Scott’s Prometheus and Brian DePalma’s Passion followed. Now she stars in Vicky Jewson’s Netflix nail-biter Close, in a role based on real-life female bodyguard Jacquie Davis. In this half hour, Rapace talks about the intense training she went through to prepare for the part, and how that awareness expands to all aspects of her life. Plus she explains how “kicking ass” is more a mental exercise […]

‘Outlander’ Season 4 Is a Reminder That Love Stories on TV Are Very, Very Hard
‘Outlander’ Season 4 Is a Reminder That Love Stories on TV Are Very, Very Hard

Love stories on TV are hard, as has been observed many times in the past, because in the very long run, it’s hard for a romance to have a happy ending. Any first kiss implies that there is also a last kiss; whether it be separation or death, the idea of “together forever” is a hard one to pull off. Thus, the struggle for shows like “Outlander,” which just aired its Season 4 finale, a season which was grounded in the reunion of its central hero and heroine, but also felt the need to develop a new passion.

[Editor’s note: The following contains spoilers for the “Outlander” Season 4 finale, “Man of Worth.”]

The Starz time travel drama, created by Ronald D. Moore and based on the books by Diana Gabaldon, began as the story of Claire (Caitriona Balfe), a woman from the 1940s unexpectedly whisked back to the 1700s, where despite being married to a man from her own era,

‘Hala’: Geraldine Viswanathan Turns In Another Star-Making Performance In This Beautiful Coming-Of-Age Drama [Sundance Review]

It opens with a prayer, and then cuts to an orgasm – an awfully efficient illustration of the contradictions in its protagonist’s life. Her name is “Hala,” she’s a high school senior, and while an honest portrait of a genuine teenager is rare enough, I’m not sure we’ve ever seen a movie like this about a Muslim teen. But Minhal Baig’s tender coming-of-age drama isn’t just a matter of novelty or even representation.

Continue reading ‘Hala’: Geraldine Viswanathan Turns In Another Star-Making Performance In This Beautiful Coming-Of-Age Drama [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.

Dwayne Johnson: ‘I’m Not Ruling Out’ a Presidential Run After 2020

While the 2019 Sundance Film Festival looked back on the midterms with the crowdpleasing documentary “Knock Down the House,” the field of 2020 presidential candidates has continued to take shape in the outside world. But one Sundance visitor whose name was once floated as a candidate has no plans to announce his run this year: Dwayne Johnson, who produced the festival’s surprise British wrestling comedy “Fighting With My Family,” has been watching the pieces come together from the sidelines — but said in an interview that he hasn’t given up on the idea of a candidacy at some point.

“I saw Kamala Harris’ speech the other day and thought it was good,” he said. “Just for me, I lack the experience, I lack a lot of things. Certainly not right now.”

Johnson first took his name out of the running in a Rolling Stone article last year. Since then, he has kept the possibility in mind,

‘Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men’ Review: Sacha Jenkins’ Music Doc Brings the Ruckus — Sundance
‘Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men’ Review: Sacha Jenkins’ Music Doc Brings the Ruckus — Sundance

Sacha Jenkins’ documentary lets the Wu-Tang Clan speak for themselves, as it should, considering all the surviving members are eager participants. Starting with the simple assertion that the Staten Island-born hip-hop group was named after the best — the best “sword style,” as RZA puts it — and became the best rap brotherhood there ever was, “Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men” chronicles every meaningful beat of the group’s ongoing career. And they do it as they’ve done just about everything: together.

RZA, ever the frontman, introduces each member over the course of a zig-zagging 20-minute opening. There’s Ghostface Killah, “the most dangerous villain”; Method Man, who always had the best hooks; Raekwon, the “eloquent” chef of the streets; U-God, who RZA notes “always had an aggressive violence” to him; Inspectah Deck, who “saw everything”; the 2007 addition and “slang master” Cappadonna; the man who “through his realness” became Masta Killa; Gza,