Ghost review – Patrick Swayze's immortal meditation on love and grief

Published on Feb 14, 2020

Ghost review – Patrick Swayze's immortal meditation on love and grief

Three decades on, this weepie classic retains an innocence and earnestness that makes it as delightfully comforting as ever

Veteran producer-screenwriter Bruce Joel Rubin created a comfort-food weepie classic with his gem Ghost, the story of a murdered young man who sticks around as a ghost to watch over his grieving artist girlfriend. It is now rereleased in UK cinemas for the 30-year anniversary. This is a film that for its global army of fans attained a new level of sadness when its star, Patrick Swayze, died of pancreatic cancer in 2009 at the age of 57.

Rubin’s script is a lethally effective tragicomic fantasy. Ghost looks more Spielbergian every time I watch it, and Rubin must surely have hoped that the man himself might have been interested in directing – he has candidly admitted to being disconcerted when the studio put comedy specialist Jerry Zucker at the helm. But that choice was inspired.

Read full article at: The Guardian - Film News

Author: Peter Bradshaw