‘Buñuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles’: Deconstructing a Documentary Through Animation

Published on Aug 15, 2019

‘Buñuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles’: Deconstructing a Documentary Through Animation

With “Buñuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles”, Salvador Simó proves once again that animation is perfect for expressing the collision of inner and outer worlds. In his first feature, he explores how legendary surrealist director Luis Buñuel found his artistic voice and social consciousness while making the controversial documentary, “Land Without Bread (1933), about the most impoverished region of Spain.

“In this place, something happened with his heart because he changed,” said Spanish animator and VFX artist-turned director Simó (“The Jungle Book”). “He was able to bond with the people and see the suffering first-hand. This was the first time he faced reality in a really raw way. And the way he made films changed.”

After savaging modern French society in the scandalous “L’Age d’Or” (1930), Buñuel humbly turned his provocative sights closer to home with his lone documentary, thanks to financing from his sculptor friend, Ramon Acin, who

Read full article at: Indiewire

Author: Bill Desowitz