Alison Klayman’s ‘The Brink’ Is A Powerful Documentary Examining Steve Bannon’s Brand Of Political Manipulation [Review]

“You always wear two shirts?” someone asks Steve Bannon, Donald Trump’s former Chief Strategist. Looking back on old photos – openly remarking his distaste for reflecting over memories – we see that his fashion choice, layering one collared shirt atop another, is a habit so old he can’t even remember when it started – same goes for his sly smile. “You smirk and it’s uncomfortable for me,” a reporter comments, after Bannon dismisses accusations pointed at his adept dog-whistling.

Continue reading Alison Klayman’s ‘The Brink’ Is A Powerful Documentary Examining Steve Bannon’s Brand Of Political Manipulation [Review] at The Playlist.

‘Us’: Lupita Nyong’o & Jordan Peele Talk The Unlikely Inspiration For Red’s Unique Voice

**Spoilers for Jordan Peele’s “Us.” You’ve been warned.**

If you’ve seen “Us,” the latest horror film from writer-director Jordan Peele, you’re probably left with many questions. The trailers and marketing for the horror film are great teases for “Us,” but they sure don’t cover everything the filmmaker throws at you over the run-time. And while you are probably on the hunt for the answers to all those questions that you left the theater left, it doesn’t appear that Peele is going to give you everything you want.

Continue reading ‘Us’: Lupita Nyong’o & Jordan Peele Talk The Unlikely Inspiration For Red’s Unique Voice at The Playlist.

Oscar-Winning Production Designers Call High School ‘Alien’ Play ‘Deeply Visionary’
Oscar-Winning Production Designers Call High School ‘Alien’ Play ‘Deeply Visionary’

The 40th anniversary of Ridley Scott’s iconic “Alien” received a stunning homage Friday night: A student production from a New Jersey high school drama club went viral. Twitter was abuzz with video footage and industry praise, including a shout out from Adam Savage of “MythBusters” (“Omfsm i need to see this. Wow”).

On March 19 and 22, North Bergen High staged a faithful adaption titled, “Alien: The Play,” replete with hand-made Xenomorph costume and re-enactment of the Facehugger scene. While crude, they still bear the unmistakable look of H.R. Giger’s legendary designs.

Overseen by drama and art instructors Perfecto Cuervo (who even made a trailer) and Steven Defendini, the production boasted a rare combination of outside-the-box ingenuity and improvised craftsmanship from a half dozen students. A standard Xenomorph costume was purchased on clearance and enhanced with a plastic skeleton from Target and foam donated by a local scenery company.

“We

Oprah Announces Two Documentary Projects & Book Club Return For New Apple Streaming Service

The Apple TV event has just ended, and the world is finally updated on what the tech company has planned for its streaming takeover. And to cap off the event, Apple decided to bring out the big gun. No, they had already introduced J.J. Abrams, Jason Momoa, Alfre Woodard, Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Aniston, and Steven Spielberg. To top all of that, Apple decided to bring Oprah Winfrey on stage, and in doing so, announced just what the media mogul is up to with the tech company.

Continue reading Oprah Announces Two Documentary Projects & Book Club Return For New Apple Streaming Service at The Playlist.

‘Avengers: Endgame’ Reportedly Clocks In At Just Over 3 Hours & Bladders All Around The World Mourn

If the largest seller of movie tickets online is a reputable source for such things, we can now confirm that Marvel Studios has officially ventured into unknown territory with its 22nd film. According to Fandango, “Avengers: Endgame” is officially over 3 hours long, clocking in at a whopping 182 minutes. And while eclipsing the run-time of the $2 billion behemoth ‘Infinity War,’ by just 22 minutes, doesn’t seem like a lot on paper, the extra length might have a bit of a ripple effect that could affect the box office of the new ‘Avengers’ film.

Continue reading ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Reportedly Clocks In At Just Over 3 Hours & Bladders All Around The World Mourn at The Playlist.

Woodsrider: On Three Rainy Weeks Filming on Oregon’s Snowy Mt. Hood

In 2014 I shot a documentary in roughly three weeks. It took place exclusively in the small town of Government Camp, Or, the closest feeder village to the Mt. Hood ski resorts of Timberline, Mt Hood Meadows and Skibowl. I had cast 19-year old Sadie Ford as the lead character. She responded to a flyer I posted at the Govy Market searching for someone who ticked off my boxes: Sadie was a passionate snowboarder (not a pro), planning to live on the mountain full-time for the winter season, and was willing to let me follow her around with a camera. […]

“We Make the Films We Can Make, Not the Ones We Want to Make”: Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Qumra Masterclass

An initiative of the Doha Film Institute, Qumra is an event that connects Qatari and international directors who are receiving different stages of Dfi-funded support with industry delegates from across the spectrum of the film world and master filmmakers who meet with emerging talents and engage in public conversations. The 5thedition took place between March 15thand 20th, 2019. Kiyoshi Kurosawa is known best as a horror filmmaker but the prolific director has effortlessly moved between different genres—his latest, To the Ends of the Earth, a drama expected to play Cannes, is about a young woman shooting a travel show in […]

Late Buñuel: Women, Surrealism, Power

Obscure Objects of Desire: The Films of Luis Buñuel is showing March 12 – May 23, 2019 on Mubi in the United Kingdom.“Luis was a jealous macho. His wife had to be a kind-of child woman who had not matured,” said Jeanne Rucar, Luis Buñuel’s wife, summing up their marriage. Rucar’s personal note has surprising bearing on the director’s oeuvre. Vicious, dreamlike, sly, witty, deviant—Buñuel the artist was all those things. Besides colorful tales of his petit bourgeois upbringing and his ascetic adult life, what truly fascinates is his surrealism. Buñuel left Spain for Paris five years before Un chien andalou (1929), and the French Surrealists embraced his work (even thought he claimed not to know about them while conceiving his debut). L'âge d'or (1930), his second collaboration with Salvador Dalí, followed, to critical acclaim.What does this have to do with women? In her book on abstract expressionist art in New York,

Source: MUBI

SXSW 2019: Global Highlights and Familiar Faces

South MountainIn my last dispatch from Austin I pinpointed the Visions section as a shortcut to South by Southwest’s generally more adventurous programming, if only to facilitate sifting through a number of arcane plot summaries. High-profile acts are bound to the festival thanks to tradition, release date timing, and in some cases city loyalty (think Richard Linklater’s Boyhood and Terrence Malick’s Song to Song; both were shot in Austin and both ultimately premiered at SXSW). It would seem that some worthy but inconspicuous titles could easily fall between the cracks, though pioneers like Barry Jenkins prove otherwise. This year’s Global section I found particularly fertile, with titles ranging from X&Y, artist Anna Oddell’s experimental film inquisition of public personas and gender roles, to Marlén Viñayo’s Cachada: The Opportunity, a documentary about a group of working-class Salvadoran women that stage a performative re-enactment of their traumatic life stories.

Source: MUBI

‘Killing Eve’ Review: Season 2 Struts to the Same, Quirky Beat With an Inviting Twist
‘Killing Eve’ Review: Season 2 Struts to the Same, Quirky Beat With an Inviting Twist

For all the excited discourse bubbling around “Killing Eve” Season 1, one element of BBC America’s compelling new drama was often overlooked: At its core, it’s a procedural. Sure, the action is serialized, but the narrative nevertheless circles around one cop’s quest to catch a criminal, and episodes find new ways for the two to butt heads, cross paths, and obsessively circle one another like hungry cats not sure what to do with the mouse they’re stalking.

With that in mind, it should come as no surprise that Season 2 wastes little time reestablishing the dynamic it pretended to blow up during last year’s finale. Yes, MI6 agent Eve (Sandra Oh) finally came face to face with Villanelle (Jodie Comer), the assassin she hunted (and fell for?) over an intense investigation, but she only appeared to make a decision. She stabbed her. She hurt her. But she also let her go.

Sensing Transgender: Lana and Lily Wachowski’s "The Matrix"

“What you know, you can’t explain. But you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life. There’s something wrong with the world. You don’t know what it is, but it’s there.” This is what Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne) tells Neo (Keanu Reeves) in Lana and Lily Wachowski’s The Matrix (1999) when proposing the red pill, that will begin him on his hero’s journey as “The One,” or the blue pill scenario, returning him to his former, average life. In recent years, “red pilled” went from an Internet meme to crossing over into a popular political identity and discourse revolving around MRAs (men’s rights activists) and the alt-right. Pieces written on the 20th anniversary celebration of The Matrix will likely include its unintentional associations with that repulsive political current that co-opted the idea of taking “the blue pill or red pill?” But this same scene has another,

Source: MUBI

‘Veep’ Review: Season 7 Is the Ideal and Brilliant Culmination of HBO’s Political Satire
‘Veep’ Review: Season 7 Is the Ideal and Brilliant Culmination of HBO’s Political Satire

More than two years ago, prior to “Veep” Season 6, much was made about the effect Donald Trump would have on HBO’s political satire. How could such an enormous, unexpected shift in America go unremarked upon by TV’s most prescient comedy on American government? But the season was already written. The Trump effect was relatively moot in the alternate reality established within the series, even if showrunner David Mandel and his award-winning writing staff still proved their Nostradamus-esque abilities to predict future political foibles more than a few times over.

Now, “Veep” has adjusted. Deliberately or instinctively, its searing viewpoint on the system and its players has widened to include those formerly outside the bubble. Season 7 — the series’ last — takes aim not only the power-hungry politicians, but also at the willfully ignorant American people who stubbornly support them. That includes the viewers at home; those who carelessly laughed at

The Criterion Channel Launches April 8 With David Lynch Retrospective & Other Streaming Gems

We are mere days away from the highly-anticipated launch of The Criterion Channel streaming service. On April 8, rising out of the ashes of FilmStruck, The Criterion Channel will begin to stream the very best classic and contemporary films that any true cinephile will enjoy. And in advance of its launch, we now have a very specific idea of what subscribers will have access to next month.

For those that didn’t follow the drama of 2018, after the sudden (and shocking) demise of the FilmStruck streaming service, filmmakers and fans were outraged and asking WarnerMedia for a new location for the library of titles that were found on the service.

Continue reading The Criterion Channel Launches April 8 With David Lynch Retrospective & Other Streaming Gems at The Playlist.

‘Unicorn Store’ Trailer: Bright Colors Abound In Brie Larson’s Directorial Debut Coming To Netflix

One of the most anticipated films to come out of the 2017 Tiff was Brie Larson’s directorial debut “Unicorn Store.” The film seems to be in line with Larson’s own description of the film being “an abstract self-portrait of myself.”

Read More: ‘Unicorn Store’: Brie Larson Gets Whimsical With Her Directorial Debut [Tiff Review]

The official synopsis reads:

“Kit (Larson) is a die-hard dreamer, an artist whose canvases are riddled with rainbows and glitter.

Continue reading ‘Unicorn Store’ Trailer: Bright Colors Abound In Brie Larson’s Directorial Debut Coming To Netflix at The Playlist.

‘Us’ Makes a Radical Argument for Black Identity By Ignoring It
‘Us’ Makes a Radical Argument for Black Identity By Ignoring It

Jordan Peele said he initially intended “Get Out” as a sledgehammer response to the illusion of a “post-racial” America. “The movie was written in the Obama era, which I’ve been calling the post-racial lie,” Peele said after a Vanity Fair screening of the film in October 2017. “That’s the era I imagined this movie would come out in.”

With “Us,” Peele takes the opposite approach: His latest horror movie features a predominantly black cast, but race doesn’t influence the plot. As a result, Peele delivers a more complex assessment of black identity by ignoring it altogether.

“Us” stars Lupita Nyong’o, Winston Duke, Evan Alex, and Shahadi Wright Joseph as a family confronted by a group of doppelgängers. A home-invasion chiller that messily unfolds with elements of other horror movie subgenres – without neatly fitting into any single one of them — “Us” could open conversations about a range of issues facing American society.

Jordan Peele Reveals The Political & Social Message Of ‘Us’ As Well As His Surprising Cameos In The New Film & ‘Get Out’

**Slight spoilers ahead for the latest film from filmmaker Jordan Peele, “Us,” which hits theaters this weekend. You’ve been warned**

First and foremost, Jordan Peele’s latest film, “Us,” is an unabashed horror film. Unlike “Get Out,” which can find itself sitting more comfortably in the psychological thriller genre, “Us” goes full-on horror, with the inclusion of its very own “monsters” in the form of the Tethered.

Continue reading Jordan Peele Reveals The Political & Social Message Of ‘Us’ As Well As His Surprising Cameos In The New Film & ‘Get Out’ at The Playlist.

Disney Already Showing Off ‘The Shape Of Water,’ ‘Avatar,’ and Other Fox Titles in Company Banner

Disney isn’t wasting any time when it comes to integrating Fox properties into its marketing following the $71.3 billion Disney-Fox merger that was finalized March 21. Major Fox properties “The Shape of Water,” “Deadpool,” “The Simpsons,” “Avatar,” and “Atlanta” have already been added to the official The Walt Disney Company banner on the company’s website. If Disney was going to prominently feature any Fox properties on its official banner, it makes sense it would do so with a recent Best Picture Oscar winner (“The Shape of Water”), a $2 billion franchise (“Avatar”), a record-breaking television series (“Simpsons”), and more.

With the Disney-Fox merger finalized, the Mouse House now owns film division 20th Century Fox and will distribute such tentpoles as James Cameron’s forthcoming “Avatar” sequels. The merger has given Disney control of blockbuster properties such as “Deadpool” and “X-Men,” in addition to their in-house mega-franchises “Star Wars” and the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

‘Grass’ Trailer: Hong Sang-soo and Kim Min-hee’s Café Society — Exclusive

Cinema Guild has unveiled the trailer for Hong Sang-soo’s “Grass,” the prolific Korean auteur’s 22nd feature. It’s also his fifth with frequent collaborator and romantic partner Kim Min-hee, perhaps best known for her role in “The Handmaiden,” who likewise stars in “Hotel by the River,” Hong’s other 2018 premiere. After debuting in Berlin last year, the 66-minute black-and-white film went on to screen at the Busan and New York film festivals, among others. Avail yourself of the trailer below.

Here, as they say, is the synopsis: “For his 22nd feature as director, Hong Sangsoo delivers a delicious cinematic riddle only he could concoct. In the corner of a small café, Areum (Kim Minhee) sits typing on her laptop. At the tables around her, other customers enact the various dramas of their lives. A young couple charge each other with serious crimes, an old man tries to rekindle

‘Sopranos’ & ‘Boardwalk Empire’ Director Hired To Helm HBO’s ‘Perry Mason’ Series Starring Matthew Rhys

After a long development process that saw original star Robert Downey, Jr. step away, the reimagined “Perry Mason” TV series is officially ready to go and has the green light from HBO to begin production. The go-ahead came just after it was announced that director Tim Van Patten has come aboard to helm the limited series that will now star Matthew Rhys in the title role.

Continue reading ‘Sopranos’ & ‘Boardwalk Empire’ Director Hired To Helm HBO’s ‘Perry Mason’ Series Starring Matthew Rhys at The Playlist.

Let’s Discuss What Part II Of ‘The Oa’ Means For The Series [Spoilers]

**Spoilers for Season 2 of “The Oa,” which hit Netflix today. You’ve been warned.**

**

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“Superimpose: 7 Hours 46 Minutes Earlier…

Ext. Windy Road – Night

We hear knocking sounds, after which the camera Cuts To a Man, ripped jeans, skateboarding down a dark, steep road. He sees a woman in a shiny, red dress on the side of the road.

Continue reading Let’s Discuss What Part II Of ‘The Oa’ Means For The Series [Spoilers] at The Playlist.

‘The Eyes Of Orson Welles’ Is An Illuminating Love Letter That Is Too Preoccupied With Its Own Personal Touches [Review]

Orson Welles made films about giants grappling with fantasies. He was an artist lost to time, who believed in the myth of honor and the power of chivalry but was perhaps too romantic to see how a knight-errant who views a windmill as the call to adventure may have already lost their expressed battle for ideology. Welles claimed to value citizens more than cinema. His relatively short-lived Hollywood career backs up this statement; though perhaps, in truth, his two loves were but inevitably irreconcilable tyrants.

Continue reading ‘The Eyes Of Orson Welles’ Is An Illuminating Love Letter That Is Too Preoccupied With Its Own Personal Touches [Review] at The Playlist.

‘Arrested Development’: Take The Forget-Me-Not Roofies & Cherish Those Memory Of The Show You Once Loved [Season 5 Review]

And now the story of a beloved comedy series that lost everything and the eccentric, determined creator who felt he had no choice, but to keep the show running, way past its prime and beyond the point of being funny. It’s “Arrested Development.”

To recap, “Arrested Development,” in its precarious, always-on-the-edge-of-cancelation Fox years, was your favorite comedy series. Critically-acclaimed, Emmy-respected, ‘Ad,’ had little viewership, but soon developed a huge comedy following and was cherished by humor geeks and famous comedians.

Continue reading ‘Arrested Development’: Take The Forget-Me-Not Roofies & Cherish Those Memory Of The Show You Once Loved [Season 5 Review] at The Playlist.

‘Los Espookys’: Fred Armisen’s Spanish-Language HBO Comedy to Premiere at ATX Festival
‘Los Espookys’: Fred Armisen’s Spanish-Language HBO Comedy to Premiere at ATX Festival

To the growing list of offerings at the 2019 ATX Festival — which already includes a screening of clips from the never-aired “Tremors” pilot — add some Fred Armisen. “Los Espookys,” which stars Armisen and is HBO’s first Spanish-language series, will make its premiere at the Austin-based festival on the first weekend of June. Per HBO’s official synopsis the series “follows a group of friends who turn their love for horror into a peculiar business, providing horror to those who need it, in a dreamy Latin American country where the strange and eerie are just part of daily life.”

Co-written by “Saturday Night Live” writer Julio Torres and Ana Fabrega (“At Home with Amy Sedaris”), the six-part season of “Los Espookys” is slated to arrive on HBO in June, following its Atx Festival premiere. Torres, Fabrega, and Armisen will also be on hand for a panel following the ATX screening.

The

‘Unicorn Store': Brie Larson Makes Magic in Directorial Debut
‘Unicorn Store': Brie Larson Makes Magic in Directorial Debut

Brie Larson has already conquered the box office this year with the record-breaking success of “Captain Marvel,” and she’s set to do it all over again at the end of April with the release of “Avengers: Endgame.” In between those massive Hollywood tentpoles, Larson will return to her indie roots with the release of her directorial debut “Unicorn Store.” The quirky comedy-drama premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2017 and will finally get an official release thanks to Netflix.

The official synopsis from Netflix reads: “After failing out of art school and taking a humdrum office job, a whimsical painter (Larson) gets a chance to fulfill her lifelong dream of adopting a unicorn.” Larson has assembled a strong ensemble cast to play opposite her in front of the camera, including her “Kong: Skull Island” and McU co-star Samuel L. Jackson, as well as Hamish Linklater, Joan Cusack and

“I Had To Tell a Story About Five Guys Working Behind Computer Screens”: Hans Pool on Bellingcat: Truth in a Post-Truth World

Hans Pool’s Bellingcat: Truth in a Post-Truth World follows the diehard band of brothers behind the online investigative outfit Bellingcat, founded by a shy Brit determined to unmask some of the media’s most notorious blockbuster stories. Whether that be through geo-location mapping, voice analysis, drone imagery, or even fact-checking legacy organizations like the NY Times (one of several outlets to report a staged car bombing as real), the international collective takes tools once the province of law enforcement and other paid “professionals” to separate fact from fiction in a very 21st century way. Filmmaker spoke with the […]

‘Tell It To The Bees’ Trailer: Anna Paquin Stars In A Defiant Lesbian Romance

The last time most of us saw Anna Paquin, she was on “True Blood” fighting supernatural beings. But now, the Oscar-winning actress is making a return to the silver screen with a powerful love story. “Tell It To The Bees” looks to be a courageous romance about overcoming the sharp stings of adversity.

In “Tell It To The Bees,” Paquin plays Jean Markham, a doctor who moves into a small town.

Continue reading ‘Tell It To The Bees’ Trailer: Anna Paquin Stars In A Defiant Lesbian Romance at The Playlist.

‘The Dirt’: Superficial Greatest Hits Look At Mötley Crüe’s Debauchery Is An Anti-Dr. Feelgood Disaster [Review]

It’s not often you see a movie open where a rock star performs cunnilingus with gusto in the middle of a party, while the singer of the band doggy style fucks another and then said groupie squirts across the room in stuttering slow motion to an eruption of rowdy cheers. But hey, this is the story of Mötley Crüe, and these dirtbag lowlifes are obviously a classy bunch. Because, if you take classic tales of debauched hedonism— Led Zeppelin’s Hammer of the Gods, Aerosmith’s Walk This Way, and even Marilyn Manson’s The Long Hard Road Out of Hell— Mötley Crüe’s The Dirt: Confessions of the World’s Most Notorious Rock Band, takes the cake.

Continue reading ‘The Dirt’: Superficial Greatest Hits Look At Mötley Crüe’s Debauchery Is An Anti-Dr. Feelgood Disaster [Review] at The Playlist.

“I Wanted Men to Engage with the Subject of Sexual Violence….”: Nancy Schwartzman on Roll Red Roll

Since Nancy Schwartzman’s filmography includes the short docs The Line, which explores sexual boundaries and consent, and xoxosms, a love story revolving around teens and tech, it’s obvious that the rape of a teenage girl by members of Ohio’s celebrated Steubenville High School football team back in 2012 would grab this director-producer-media-strategist’s attention. After all, the assault had been documented through Facebook, Twitter, text messaging, and even cell phone recordings by the assailants, and it was subsequently brought to the world’s attention by a female crime blogger. Now, nearly seven years after the crime, Schwartzman takes a deeper look, revisiting […]

“I Wanted Men to Engage with the Subject of Sexual Violence….”: Nancy Schwartzman on Roll Red Roll

Since Nancy Schwartzman’s filmography includes the short docs The Line, which explores sexual boundaries and consent, and xoxosms, a love story revolving around teens and tech, it’s obvious that the rape of a teenage girl by members of Ohio’s celebrated Steubenville High School football team back in 2012 would grab this director-producer-media-strategist’s attention. After all, the assault had been documented through Facebook, Twitter, text messaging, and even cell phone recordings by the assailants, and it was subsequently brought to the world’s attention by a female crime blogger. Now, nearly seven years after the crime, Schwartzman takes a deeper look, revisiting […]

Review: House of Mirrors—Jordan Peele’s "Us"

"Once upon a time there was a girl, and she had a shadow."It’s 1987: a child version of Lupita Nyong’o’s Adelaide (played by Madison Currie) watches a commercial for then-President Ronald Reagan’s racial tension appeasement stunt known as the “Hands Across America” initiative. Like the beginning of Gaspar Noé’s Climax, the TV set is flanked by rows of VHS tapes that make transparent the film’s influences: A Nightmare on Elm Street, C.H.U.D, The Goonies. Adelaide here sees her reflection upon the saturated blue skies of the broadcast, then again in more disturbing circumstances towards the end of this prologue, in the fun-house mirrors of a beachside carnival. In both cases, there is something discomfiting about the act of self-confrontation.So begins Jordan Peele’s intrepid new horror picture, Us. Though bedazzled with nods to the great American suspense films, Peele

Source: MUBI

Oscar-Winning ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ Editor Knows That Meeting Scene Is Poorly Edited
Oscar-Winning ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ Editor Knows That Meeting Scene Is Poorly Edited

Bohemian Rhapsody” won John Ottman his first Oscar for Best Film Editing, but the victory led to a considerable amount of backlash from moviegoers and film critics who believed the Queen biopic was one of the worst edited films of the year. In the wake of the Oscar win, a scene from the film in which the band meets with their eventual manager, John Reid (Aidan Gillen), went viral online for its sloppy and disorienting editing rhythm. The scene even inspired a video essay examining the bad editing choices that has earned over 1.6 million views on YouTube.

While Ottman deserves credit for editing together a coherent film following the behind-the-scenes drama that resulted in director Bryan Singer being fired with three weeks left in production, not even he will try to defend the much-mocked scene of Queen’s meeting with Reid. In a recent interview with The Washington Post, Ottman

‘Parks and Recreation’ Reunion: The Very Good Reason Why There May Never Be a Revival
‘Parks and Recreation’ Reunion: The Very Good Reason Why There May Never Be a Revival

In the age of reboots and revivals, not even flashing forward 50 years to provide definitive closure for every character can keep the question of a comeback at bay. That’s how it felt in the Dolby Theater Thursday evening when the cast and creator of “Parks and Recreation” gathered to celebrate the 10-year anniversary of their premiere, and the sold-out audience waited with bated breath for news of more new episodes.

What would it take to bring back “Parks and Rec”?

“I think in the world we live in now nothing is ever gone,” Michael Schur told Patton Oswalt, the panel moderator and former guest star on “Parks and Rec.” “I think everyone on this stage — and like six other people — would have to feel like there’s a story that needed to be told. What I felt personally, the show had an argument to make and the argument was about teamwork,

‘The Dirt’ Review: Netflix Gives Mötley Crüe Their Very Own ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’
‘The Dirt’ Review: Netflix Gives Mötley Crüe Their Very Own ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’

As Andy Warhol famously never said: “In the future, every arena-sized music act of the 20th century will get its own ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ for 115 minutes.” The truth of those apocryphal words was obvious even before the execrable Queen biopic grossed almost a billion dollars; the age of infinite content doesn’t offer enough bandwidth for actual creation, so most of our pop culture has to be exhumed from the past (a phenomenon made literal by the sustained explosion of true crime stories). It was all fun and games — sequels and reboots — until someone figured out that music could be a magic bullet for mainstream biopics, and then — wham! — the next thing we knew, Rami Malek had won Best Actor for cosplaying as Freddie Mercury in a movie that supposedly directed itself.

This might not be so bad if every band got the “Bohemian Rhapsody” that it deserved. By that logic,